Success in HR Does Not Define You. But Here’s Who Does.

by Alan Collins

Success in HR does not define you.

YOU define success in HR.

Confused?

There are two HR people who illustrate this perfectly.

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Here’s person #1.

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HR Consulting on the Side: “I’ve Just Landed My First Gig. What’s Your Advice?”

Hi Alan,

For the first time, I’m going to be doing some HR consulting on the side for a small business. 

What I should charge to create a company handbook, revise new hire paperwork, including an online employee application…and be available for phone consultation?

I want to be reasonable but also don’t want to cut myself short.  

Any advice on what to charge and on agreements you have that you would be willing to share would be appreciated?

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Got an HR Interview on Short Notice? Here’s A One-Page Cheat Sheet.

by Alan Collins

More and more HR interviews are happening on short notice.

That’s a fact.

Sudden resignations or the desire to fill HR or Talent Management jobs quickly are putting recruiters under pressure more than ever.

So, if you should get a request to interview — let’s say tomorrow or the next day — don’t be surprised.  BE PREPARED!  It could be for your HR dream job.

Want to crush it? Below is a “one-page cheat sheet” with proven best practices.

It’s based on avoiding mistakes I see HR folks making all the time.

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The Awesome Power of Standing Up For Yourself in HR

by Alan Collins

Years ago, I made an honest, but frustrating mistake many HR professionals make.

It was one that taught me the value of standing up for yourself and sticking to your guns — when you  know you’re right.

It occurred when a hiring executive called me and wanted me to make an offer to an outstanding engineering candidate.

The position had been tough to fill.  We’d been searching for months and interviewed tons of candidates.  But we had finally landed our person.

I called the candidate. Made a verbal offer of $130K plus our standard bonus and benefit package.  The candidate was overjoyed and he verbally accepted over the phone. Everything clicked.

Except one thing.

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The Day I Was Forced To Fire My HR Staff…And What I Learned About Dealing With Change!

by Alan Collins

Years ago, I was forced to downsize my HR team by 10%.

This meant firing six talented folks that I had worked with for years.

Their performance results were terrific.

I knew their families.

I had bonded with them personally.

We had enjoyed lots of great times together.

So this was going to be tough.

I hated it and didn’t want to do it.

And I pushed back hard on the decision.

The result was I got smacked down equally as hard!

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What’s Your Biggest HR Career Mistake? Here’s Mine.

by Alan Collins

Brutally honest question time.

In the spirit of openness and candor, here’s mine.

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HR Director Fired After “Good” Performance Review — And How To Keep This From Happening To You!

by Alan Collins

Last year, a senior HR director friend was fired after her year-end performance review. 

What was especially brutal was her boss’ overall evaluation of her performance.

She had been rated a “3” on her company’s 5-point scale, which was “good.”

And she was further informed that her performance was “solid” and that everything was okay.

Knowing that, she signed off on the review.

So, she was blindsided beyond belief when she was called back in a few weeks later…and fired! 

Candidly, she knew her performance wasn’t stellar.

But she was devastated by this news and clearly didn’t think she’d get whacked.

Matters became worse when she was told by her boss that, after discussing the company’s financial troubles with the higher-ups, THEY (not he) decided to eliminate her job.

They agreed she was doing a good job.  But they didn’t feel that SHE — as well as THE JOB she was in — was adding enough value to the business.

Read that last sentence again.

Good performance wasn’t enough.

It wasn’t a performance issue.

It was just time to whack her job.

And her.

Her manager blamed the decision on his bosses.

Yeah, right…

What a spineless, freakin’ wimp!

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